A cut above: Flanken-cut beef short ribs - Carolina's CW | WYCW-TV

A cut above: Flanken-cut beef short ribs

Updated: Jan 12, 2012 03:21 PM EST
© Todd Coleman / Bonnier © Todd Coleman / Bonnier
  • Past stories from SaveurMore>>

  • Crawfish: Born on the Bayou

    Crawfish: Born on the Bayou

    Called both crayfish and crawfish, these tiny freshwater cousins to lobsters are firm and sweet. Plunged into boiling water, they cook through in just two minutes and easily soak up any seasonings, from classic Cajun spices to Asian-style ginger and garlic.
    Called both crayfish and crawfish, these tiny freshwater cousins to lobsters are firm and sweet. Plunged into boiling water, they cook through in just two minutes and easily soak up any seasonings, from classic Cajun spices to Asian-style ginger and garlic.
  • Fabled feta cheese

    Fabled feta cheese

    Just a crumble of feta's pungent, salty flavor enhances dishes from stuffed peppers to salads to savory tarts.
    Just a crumble of feta's pungent, salty flavor enhances dishes from stuffed peppers to salads to savory tarts.
  • The pasta lesson: Making orecchiette in Puglia

    The pasta lesson: Making orecchiette in Puglia

    While most of Italy embraces pasta, Puglia takes that love even further.
    While most of Italy embraces pasta, Puglia takes that love even further.


By Gabriella Gershenson


The recipe for t'fina pkalia, the Tunisian Jewish beef, spinach, and white bean stew, calls for flanken-cut beef short ribs.


Flanken
means "flank" in German and in Yiddish, and it refers to short ribs (the ribs that span from the back toward the belly of the cow) cut across the bones.


Available at most butcher shops, flanken ribs are four to eight inches long and about one and a half inches wide, with four or five oval-shaped cross-sections of bone along the edge.


Historically, it was a cut of meat that many people could afford, and because it's tough and well-marbled with lots of connective tissue, flanken lends itself well to slow-cooked stews.


Be it t'fina pkalia or Eastern European cholent (made from beans, barley, meat, and potatoes), flanken is the ideal cut: Over time, the ribs release their ample fat, collagen, and bone marrow into the stew, imparting profound richness and depth of flavor.


Other styles of beef short rib include the more common English cut, which is sliced parallel to the rib, and beef spare ribs, which are thinner and more tender than the English cut and don't contain the full bone.


According to Paul Whitman, owner of Fischer Brothers & Leslie, a kosher butcher shop in Manhattan, each cut has its purpose and its season.


"In the summer, when people are barbecuing, they buy more spare ribs," he said. "But in the winter, when they're making stews, they want flanken." 

 

© 2012 SAVEUR
All rights reserved.
*DISCLAIMER*: The information contained in or provided through this site section is intended for general consumer understanding and education only and is not intended to be and is not a substitute for professional advice. Use of this site section and any information contained on or provided through this site section is at your own risk and any information contained on or provided through this site section is provided on an "as is" basis without any representations or warranties.
Powered by WorldNow

250 International Dr.
Spartanburg, S.C. 29303

Telephone: 864.576.7777
Fax: 864.587.5430
Email: webmaster@carolinascw.com

Can't find something?
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Media General Communications Holdings, LLC. A Media General Company.